Correlation of Pathological Manifestations in Covid 19 Positive Cases Complicated by Either Isolated Mucormycosis or Co-Infection with Other Fungi: Experiences of a Tertiary Level Institute

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Riddhi Jaiswal H S Malhotra D Himanshu

Abstract

As a part of multi-disciplinary team of the institute in managing Covid positive patients as well as those admitted with its complications, Pathology department was reporting specimens of suspected fungal infection, received from clinical departments like neurosurgery, otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology, oral and maxillofacial surgery, respiratory medicine, internal medicine etc. Simultaneous serology and various Covid associated blood parameters were being investigated during admission to hospital, as per the clinical scenario.


The aim of this paper is to discuss pathogenesis of fungal infections and bring out any significant pathological differences in Covid 19 positive cases afflicted subsequently by either mucor alone or mixed fungal infections.


Out of 274 tissue specimens received between April to November 2021, clinically suspected to be of Covid 19 associated mucormycosis, we found 14 cases of simultaneous co-infection with other species of fungi. 45 specimens were reported negative for fungal elements while 229 were confirmed by histo pathological examination.


Cases were grouped according to the presence of either only Mucormycosis on histology or mucor with co-infecting fungi.Various biochemical, hematological and histopathological parameters were compared and significance of difference analysed using student t test in the two groups.


Statistically significant differnce was observed in mean values of serum ferritin (p value 0.005); C-Reactive Protein/CRP (p value 0.003); serum creatinine, Random Blood Sugar/RBS, Haemoglobin, Total Leuocyte Count/TLC and duration of hospital stay (p value of each being 0.00) while p value was insignificant in serum Lactate Dehydrogenase/LDH and InterLeukin 6/IL6 values between the two groups.


Platelet count of patients in both the groups were within normal range. (1-4.5 x1000/cu mm). None of the Histopathological parameters showed any statistically significant difference in the two groups (p value of each was more than 0.05).


 

Article Details

How to Cite
JAISWAL, Riddhi; MALHOTRA, H S; HIMANSHU, D. Correlation of Pathological Manifestations in Covid 19 Positive Cases Complicated by Either Isolated Mucormycosis or Co-Infection with Other Fungi: Experiences of a Tertiary Level Institute. Medical Research Archives, [S.l.], v. 10, n. 3, mar. 2022. ISSN 2375-1924. Available at: <https://esmed.org/MRA/mra/article/view/2713>. Date accessed: 28 nov. 2022. doi: https://doi.org/10.18103/mra.v10i3.2713.
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