Total Unilateral Collapsed Lung- A Sequela of Pulmonary Tuberculosis- and Pregnancy Outcome

Main Article Content

Anoep Gopie

Abstract

Abstract                                                                                                                                                                            


Lung tissue damage after pulmonary tuberculosis is common and can result in persistent pulmonary disability with negative influence on a patient’s quality of life. On the other hand, a COVID-19 infection in a previously treated tuberculosis patient with residual pulmonary abnormalities imposes an increased risk of death. On their own, both of these diseases can have a devastating effect on a patient’s pulmonary system and as such be the cause of disability or even death. In this case report of total atelectasis of the left lung due to obliteration of the left main bronchus after tuberculosis treatment, we present a pregnant patient, who despite a significant reduction in pulmonary function, managed to have a pregnancy with favorable outcome. Thereafter the patient even recovered from a COVID-19 infection, illustrating resilience of the human body.

Article Details

How to Cite
GOPIE, Anoep. Total Unilateral Collapsed Lung- A Sequela of Pulmonary Tuberculosis- and Pregnancy Outcome. Medical Research Archives, [S.l.], v. 11, n. 10, oct. 2023. ISSN 2375-1924. Available at: <https://esmed.org/MRA/mra/article/view/4495>. Date accessed: 29 nov. 2023. doi: https://doi.org/10.18103/mra.v11i10.4495.
Section
Case Reports

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