Advancing New Views on the Causes and Prevention of Skin Cancer and Aging of the Skin

Main Article Content

Win L. Chiou, Ph. D.

Abstract

The prevailing belief is that sunlight, particularly UV rays, leads to skin damage that accumulates, potentially causing skin cancer and photoaging. Consequently, avoiding or reducing sun exposure is widely advised. This stance, however, challenges the principle of genomic stability, which is essential for the healthy and appearance-preserving progression of generations, potentially except when damage stems from severe sunburn. This leads to the concept of non-cumulative, non-detrimental DNA damage. Such a groundbreaking perspective could profoundly impact research into the causes and prevention of skin cancer and skin aging. Key insights include: the key to prevent skin cancer is to prevent severe sunburn, not chronic moderate sun  exposure that could guard against skin cancer; sunscreen is not recommended for intense intermittent sun exposure; long-term regular sun exposure may not lead to wrinkles and sagging; the intrinsic factor dominates skin aging; the UVA blockers in sunscreens might be unnecessary; traditional methods of using bolus UV doses could be problematic; low SPF sunscreens (2-8) might suffice; ultraviolet-protective clothing is advisable; some issues related to tanning salons and tinted glasses are raised; the critical role of water and nutrients is emphasized; effects of wind and heat are considered; and tissue-regenerating moisturizers are recommended for skin protection.

Keywords: skin cancer, skin aging, photoaging, sunscreen, sunburn, stem cells, wrinkles, melanoma, genome homeostasis, DNA lesions and mutation

Article Details

How to Cite
CHIOU, Win L.. Advancing New Views on the Causes and Prevention of Skin Cancer and Aging of the Skin. Medical Research Archives, [S.l.], v. 12, n. 4, may 2024. ISSN 2375-1924. Available at: <https://esmed.org/MRA/mra/article/view/5292>. Date accessed: 27 may 2024. doi: https://doi.org/10.18103/mra.v12i4.5292.
Section
Research Articles

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