Familiar Perception: Opportunities for Typical and Ideal Experiences in Early Intervention

Main Article Content

Rosa Fernandez-Valero Avivar Caceres Susana Lucia Perez-Palao

Abstract

The present study delves into the crucial domain of early childhood intervention services, with a specific focus on the familiar perspective and its impact on intervention outcomes. Family-centered practices approach emphasizes the importance of a collaborative relationship between professionals and families, to empower family strengths and their utilization in promoting optimal child development. Thus, the study aims to validate the Families in Natural Environments Scale of Service Evaluation (Family FINESSE), which assess the fidelity of intervention practices (identified as typical practices) and identify areas for improvement (identified as ideal practices) based on 432 Spanish families´ perceptions, with children aged 0 to 6 years old experiencing neurodevelopmental challenges or risks, engaged in early intervention services for a minimum of six months. We conducted Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) as the primary analytical technique for scale validation and found the Exploratory Factor Analysis and Confirmatory Factor Analysis showed optimal adjustment indices and good internal consistency in both ideal-practices (α=.84).and typical-practices (α=.93) scales.  The findings validate the relevance and applicability of the Family Finesse Scale in evaluating and enhancing early childhood intervention services, particularly in aligning practices with family needs and aspirations.

Keywords: Early Intervention, Family-Centered Practices, Neurodevelopmental Support, Family Strengths, Family Finesse Scale, Collaborative Relationships

Article Details

How to Cite
FERNANDEZ-VALERO, Rosa; SUSANA, Avivar Caceres; PEREZ-PALAO, Lucia. Familiar Perception: Opportunities for Typical and Ideal Experiences in Early Intervention. Medical Research Archives, [S.l.], v. 12, n. 4, apr. 2024. ISSN 2375-1924. Available at: <https://esmed.org/MRA/mra/article/view/5341>. Date accessed: 27 may 2024. doi: https://doi.org/10.18103/mra.v12i4.5341.
Section
Research Articles

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